“Yei dà bɛ̀ ka dà, nyaa me!” Masktape

“Yei dà bɛ̀ ka dà, nyaa me!”

(Translation: “In the bush, money is hidden, not lost.”)
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“Yei dà bɛ̀ ka dà, nyaa me!” (Translation: “In the bush, money is hidden, not lost.”) Meaning: Wealth may not always be visible or easily accessible, but it can be found or acquired with effort and resourcefulness.

#talismansofelra

Camarilla Maskbook Edgerank Algorithm

The EdgeRank algorithm used by Camarilla Maskbook to rank and show content in Masks Feeds is comprised of three factors that determines the relevant score of a post to a patron. These three factors are:

1. Affinity Score (A): This refers to the relationship between the patron and the person or page that posted the content. It is calculated based on the patron’s past interactions with that person or page (such as likes, comments, and shares). The formula for calculating the affinity score is A = log10(Number of interactions with the person or page).

2. Weight (W): Refers to the type of content being shared and its potential interest to the patron. The weight of a post can vary depending on the format, such as photos, videos, links, or plain text. Typically, Masktape Videos have the highest weight, followed by Maskbook Live videos, then photos, status updates, links, and plain text.

3. Time Decay (D): Refers to how recent a post was shared. As content ages, it becomes less relevant to patrons. The formula used to calculate the time decay factor is D = 1/(Time since the post was published).

The final Camarilla Maskbook EdgeRank score of a post is determined by multiplying the Affinity Score (A) by the Weight (W) and the Time Decay (D):

Camarilla Maskbook EdgeRank Score = A * W * D

Note that this formula is currently in use and should not be taken as a current representation of other social media algorithms where more complex formulas are at play.

Is the mask the devil?

The idea of Liberian masks being referred to as “devil masks” is a misnomer and is based on a lack of understanding and misinterpretation of the cultural significance of the masks. 

Masks are an important part of many African cultures, and they often represent spirits, ancestors, or other supernatural entities. In Liberia, masks are used in various cultural and religious contexts, including the Camarilla Mask™ societies.

The masks are not intended to represent devils or evil spirits, but rather specific spiritual entities that are revered and respected within their cultural context. The use of masks is often associated with important ceremonies, such as initiations and funerals, and is considered an important part of maintaining cultural identity and tradition.

Unfortunately, due to the history of colonialism and Christianization in Africa, there has been a tendency to demonize traditional African beliefs and practices. This has led to a misinterpretation of the cultural significance of masks and other traditional African art forms, which are often labeled as “primitive” or “evil” by outsiders.

Some Christian traditions have given the devil additional names or titles, such as “Lucifer,” which means “light-bringer” and is derived from a passage in Isaiah 14:12-15, though this passage is widely interpreted as referring to the fall of a Babylonian king rather than the devil.


Why is the mask (מסכה) referred to the people as “the Devil” when the devil has a name?

Beelzebub (Matthew 12:24,27, Mark 1:34, 3:22), The name used for the devil is right in the bible. It is coming from the ancient Babylonian god Baal for “lord” and Zebub meaning “the maggots of a fly”. Also the Mohammedans in the Koran 2:14 and 2:102 mention the name of the devil as Shayaatiynihim ((شزذثش A Plural for the Ashuric/ Syriac (Arabic) Equivalent Shaytaan of the Aramic (Hebrew) Word Satan. When the Preachers and Imaams refer to him as Shaytan or Satan that is what he is: Shay ((قي،- A thing: Tiyn (طين0 – clay- a thing of clay – that is not a name that’s a description of what he is made of.
Mask on the other hand are made of predominantly wood, metal, cowry shells, wooden beads.

In the Quran, the name for the devil is “Iblis.” This name is derived from the Arabic word “أَبْلِيس” (Iblees) which means “despair” or “despondency.”

In conclusion, while the masks of Liberia may be referred to as “devil masks” by some, this is a misnomer that reflects a lack of understanding and cultural sensitivity. It is important to recognize the cultural significance of these masks and to appreciate them within their proper context.

Tékpwfárí Stíx Él Rá

Reclaiming the African Spiritual System

In observing those adorned with the Camarilla Mask™ 16 Tribes® Necklace, one can sense the resonance of an era when Africa was imbued with the true essence of the African Spirit